Information on Coronavirus/COVID-19 from Think Whole Person Healthcare and the CDC.

The spread of Coronavirus/COVID-19 facilitates frequent changes in healthcare protocols. Our commitment to you is to post the latest information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) here as it is updated.

Steps to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 if you are sick:

Stay home – except to get medical care.

  • Stay home: People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to recover at home. Do not leave your home – except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call your doctor’s office before you go in to the office. Be sure to seek care if you feel worse or you think your illness may be an emergency.
  • Call ahead: If you have an appointment with your doctor, call the doctor’s office prior to going in and tell them you have, or may have, COVID-19. This will help the office protect themselves and other patients.
  • Wear a facemask when you are around other people and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.
  • Avoid public transportation: Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.

When at home, separate those who are ill from those who are well.

If you, or someone else, suspects they have COVID-19, or may have it, specify a “sick room” that is away from other rooms in your home. Those who are ill should use a separate bathroom, if possible.

  • If you are caring for others: If the person who is sick is not able to wear a facemask (i.e., because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live in the home should stay in a different room. When caregivers enter the room of the sick person, they should wear facemasks. Visitors, other than caregivers, are not recommended.
  • Limit contact with pets and animals.
    • Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is recommended that people with the virus limit contact with animals until more information is known.
    • When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick with COVID-19. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with them.

Avoid sharing personal household items

  • Do not share: Those who are ill should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people in your home.
  • Wash thoroughly after use: After using these items, wash them thoroughly with soap and water or put in the dishwasher.
  • Clean and disinfect – while wearing gloves and a mask – all “high-touch” surfaces every day. This includes phones, remote controls, counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables.
  • Clean and disinfect areas that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them.

How to discontinue home isolation

  • People with COVID-19 who have stayed home can stop home isolation under the following conditions:
    • If you will not have a test to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:
      • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (that is three full days of no fever without the use medicine that reduces fevers)
        AND
      • other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
        AND
      • at least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared
    • If you will be tested to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:
      • You no longer have a fever (without the use medicine that reduces fevers)
        AND
      • other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
        AND
        you received two negative tests in a row, 24 hours apart. Your doctor will follow CDC guidelines.
In all cases, follow the guidance of your healthcare provider and local health department. The decision to stop home isolation should be made in consultation with your healthcare provider and state and local health departments. Local decisions depend on local circumstances.